Schengen Agreement English

2. No Contracting Party may conclude with one or more third countries, without the prior agreement of the other Contracting Parties, agreements aimed at simplifying or abolishing border controls, subject to the right of the Member States of the European Communities to conclude such agreements jointly. 3. If the parties do not reach an agreement, the party which has not launched the call for tenders shall submit for opinion the case of the joint supervisory authority referred to in Article 115(1). If a person is already the subject of an alert in the Schengen Information System, a Contracting Party issuing another alert has reached an agreement with the Contracting Party which entered the first alert on the submission of the call for tenders. To this end, the Contracting Parties may also adopt general provisions. With the entry into force of the Schengen Protocol to the Treaty of Amsterdam of 2 On 1 October 1997, on 1 May 1999, Schengen cooperation was taken over into EU law, initially only on the basis of an international agreement. Differences of opinion between member states led to an impasse over the abolition of border controls within the Community, but in 1985 five of the then ten Member States – Belgium, France, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and West Germany – signed an agreement on the phasing out of checks at common borders. The agreement was signed on the princess marie-astrid boat on the Moselle, near the city of Schengen, Luxembourg,[5] where the territories of France, Germany and Luxembourg meet. Three of the signatories, Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, had already abolished common border controls within the framework of the Benelux Economic Union. [Citation required] 2.

Such an agreement shall be subject to ratification, acceptance or approval by the acceding State and each Contracting Party. It shall enter into force on the first day of the second month following the deposit of the final instrument of ratification, acceptance or approval. 1. In accordance with the relevant international agreements and taking into account local conditions and technical possibilities, the Parties shall establish telephone, radio and telex lines and other direct links, in particular in border areas, in order to facilitate police and customs cooperation, in particular with a view to the timely transmission of information for the purposes of cross-border surveillance and surveillance. . . .